Friday, July 6, 2012

"If you don’t know your history, you have no future."

- Jil Sander

Saturday, April 7, 2012

100% Perfect

On Seeing the 100% Perfect Girl One Beautiful April Morning by Haruki Murakami

We pass in front of a flower shop. A small, warm air mass touches my skin. The asphalt is damp, and I catch the scent of roses. I can’t bring myself to speak to her. She wears a white sweater, and in her right hand she holds a crisp white envelope lacking only a stamp. So: She’s written somebody a letter, maybe spent the whole night writing, to judge from the sleepy look in her eyes. The envelope could contain evey secret she’s ever had.

I take a few more strides and turn: She’s lost in the crowd.

Now, of course, I know exactly what I should have said to her. It would have been a long speech, though, far too long for me to have delivered it properly. The ideas I come up with are never very practical.

Oh, well. It would have started ”Once upon a time” and ended ”A sad story, don’t you think?”

Once upon a time, there lived a boy and a girl. The boy was eighteen and the girl sixteen. He was not unusually handsome, and she was not especially beautiful. They were just an ordinary lonely boy and an ordinary lonely girl, like all the others. But they believed with their whole hearts that somewhere in the world there lived the 100% perfect boy and the 100% perfect girl for them. Yes, they believed in a miracle. And that miracle actually happened.

One day the two came upon each other on the corner of a street.

”This is amazing,” he said. ”I’ve been looking for you all my life. You may not believe this, but you’re the 100% perfect girl for me.”

”And you,” she said to him, ”are the 100% perfect boy for me, exactly as I’d pictured you in every detail. It’s like a dream.”

They sat on a park bench, held hands, and told each other their stories hour after hour. They were not lonely anymore. They have found and been found by their 100% perfect other. What a wonderful thing it is to find and be found by your 100% perfect other. It’s a miracle, a cosmic miracle.

As they sat and talked, however, a tiny, tiny silver of doubt took root in their hearts: Was it really all right for one’s dreams to come true so easily? And so, when there came a momentary lull in their conversation, the boy said to the girl, ”Let’s test ourselves - just once. If we really are each other’s 100% perfect lovers, then somtime, somewhere, we will meet again without fail. And when that happens, and we know that we are the 100% perfect ones, we’ll marry than and there. What do you think?”

”Yes,” she said, ”that is exactly what we should do.”

And so they parted, she to the east, and he to the west.

The test they had agreed upon, however, wast utterly unnecessary. They should never have undertaken it, because they really and truly were each other’s 100% perfect lovers, and it was a miracle that they had ever met. But it was impossible for them to know this, young as they were. The cold, indifferent waves of fate proceeded to toss them unmercifully.

One winter, both boy and the girl came down with the season’s terrible inluenza, and after drifting for weeks between life and death they lost all memory of their earlier years. When they awoke, their heads were empty as the young D. H. Lawrence’s piggy bank.

They were two bright, determined young people, however, and through their unremitting efforts they were able to acquire once again the knowlege and feeling that qualified them to return as full-fledged members of society. Heaven be praised, they became truly upstanding citizens who knew how to transfer from one subway line to another, who were fully capable of sending a special-delivery letter at the post office. Indeed, they even experienced love again, sometimes as much as 75% or even 85% love.

Time passed with shocking swiftness, and soon the boy was thirty-two, the girl thirty.

One beautiful April morning, in search of a cup of coffe to start the day, the boy was walking from west to east, while girl, intending to send a special-delivery letter, was walking from east to west, but along the same narrow street in the Hajaruku neighborhood of Tokyo. They passed each other in the very center of the street. The faintest gleam of their lost memoires glimmered for the briefest moment in their hearts. Each felt a rumbling in their chest. And they knew:

She is the 100% perfect girl for me.

He is the 100% perfect boy for me.

But the glow of their memories was far too weak, and their thoughts no longer had clarity of fourteen years earlier. Without a word, they passed each other, disappearing into the crowd. Forever.

A sad story, don’t you think?

Yes, that’s it, that is what I should have said to her.

via divakoza

Friday, November 25, 2011


"fashion" makes me so nauseous sometimes

Monday, July 11, 2011

Random RISD photos

Jelly fish attached to each other at the Boston aquarium

The arcade in Providence which is across the street from us

Marisa's cool wooka mask

Nature Lab's random goodies

We found a dirty alley in Boston and immediately felt better (felt almost like home). Oh and it was also in Chinatown which made it even more nostalgic.

Since we live IN the building where the RISD Library is, I take out ALL the books I wantttt

"Cocktail Culture" exhibit at RISD. It's not very big but it wasn't bad at all. I especially loved this dress. It's Vera Neumann (textile) + Perry Ellis (design) from the 70s.

Friday, July 8, 2011


me: ok i need to sleep
ok good night
i'll see in 1 weeeekkk
cindy: miss you tooo

Saturday, June 25, 2011

Shanghai Part I of ?

shanghai pu-dong in your hand

easy access pants


Elton's sweat shop making Japanese fishing vests

oh yeah look at that style

Sunday, June 19, 2011

nah mean

me: nah meean?
Dian: wtf is nah meaan?
that sounds so ghetto